Historiography

Spring 2018 • HIST 491-001
info | readings

IN PROGRESS!

This syllabus is a guide, not a contract. As a living document that changes frequently depending on what’s going on with our group, you’ll want to bookmark and consult the online version of this syllabus frequently. Important links to online assignment guides and other instructions will appear throughout the course, and I will always announce important changes in class. No significant changes will be made to the overall workload. If you print out the syllabus, be sure you keep your paper version up to date with the online version.


1: Course Introductions

15: NO CLASS (MLK Holiday)

17: Syllabus, Expectations, Tools

2: Historiographical Introductions

22: What is Historiography?

  • Resolve GitHub and Markdown confusion
  • FHTH “What is Historiography?”, 1-24.

24: Mythistory

  • William H. McNeill, “Mythistory, or Truth, Myth, History, and Historians”, 1–10.

3: Premodern History

29: Ancient History

  • FHTH, 25-35.
  • Faces of History, “Roman foundations”, 48-69.

31: Medieval History

  • FHTH, 35-45.
  • Faces of History, “History in the medieval mirror”, 99-124.

4: Historiographical Revolutions

5: Early Modern Historiographical Revolutions

  • FHTH, “The historiographical revolution of the early modern era”, 47-67.

7: Historical Professionalization

  • FHTH, “The 19th century and the rise of academic scholarship”, 68-96.
  • Thomas Gil, “Leopold Ranke”, 383-92.

5: Scientific History

12: Historiography in the Early 20th Century

  • FHTH, “Scientific history in an era of conflict”, 97-124.

14: The Annales School

  • Houses, “The Annales”, 87-109.

6: Marxist / Sociological History

19: Marx and History

  • Tom Rockmore, “Marx”, 488-96.
  • Houses, “Marxist Historians”, 33-58.

21: Sociology

  • Houses, “Historical sociology”, 110-140.

7: (post)Modern Histories

26: A 20th-century overview

  • FHTH, “Glorious Confusion”, 127-65.

28: Quantitative History

  • Houses, “Quantitative History”, 141-50; skim 151-71.
  • Margo Anderson, “Qualitative History”, 246-59.

8: Micro/Macro Histories

5: Historical Scales

  • Georg Iggers, “From Macro- to Microhistory: The History of Everyday Life”, 101-117.
  • Houses, “Anthropology and ethnohistorians”, 172-203.

7: Historical Significance

  • Kieran Healy, “Fuck nuance”, 1-13.
  • Langdon Winner, “Do artifacts have politics?”, 121-35.

9: Spring Break (12 + 14)

10: De-centerings

19: Intro to Postmodernism

  • Houses, “The challenge of postmodernism/poststructuralism”, 297-325.

21: Discursive History

  • Foucault, Archeology of Knowledge, 21-39.
  • Foucault, The Birth of the Clinic, 3-20.

11: Histories of Others

26: Postcolonial Histories

  • Houses, “Postcolonial Perspectives”, 263-76.
  • Henrietta Whiteman, “White Buffalo Woman” [= Houses, 288-96] (skim).
  • Dipesh Chakrabarty, “Postcoloniality and the Artifice of History: Who Speaks for ‘Indian’ Pasts?”, 1-27.

28: Gender Histories

  • Houses, “Gender History”, 253-62.
  • Catherine Hall, “Gender Division and Class Formation in the Birmingham Middle Class, 1780-1850” [= Houses, 263-76].
  • Joan Scott, “Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis”, 1053-1075.

12: Narrative and History 1

2: The imperative of Narrative

NAH, “Introduction”, 1-15. NAH, “Narrating the Past”, 16-28. NAH, “History as Content/Story”, 29-43.

4: Narrative Baggage

NAH, “Narrating and Narration”, 44-79.

13: Narrative and History 2

9: The Past and History

NAH, “The Past, the Fact, and History”, 80-93. NAH, “Understanding [in] History”, 94-110.

11: Beyond Narrative

NAH, “The Oar in Water”, 111-122. NAH, “Conclusion”, 123-129.

14: What is History For? 1

16: Why do we study history?

  • WIHF?, “History for its own sake”, 10-30.
  • WIHF?, “Professed purposes”, 31-58.

18: Historic Motivations

  • WIHF?, “Hidden agendas”, 59-84.

15: What is History For? 2

23: Postmodern History 1

  • WIHF?, “Life and needs in Postmodernity”, 85-106.
  • WIHF?, “Histories in Postmodernity”, 107-32.

25: Postmodern History 2

  • WIHF?, “Histories for Postmodernity”, 133-53.

16: Looking Forward and Back

30: Futures of History

  • FHTH, “History in a new millennium”, 166-85.

2: Conclusions and Hints for the Final

  • No readings!

All course work due by May 11!